All posts by The Hawk

Enter ‘Guess Who?’ Contest to support The Hawk

The Hanover High School student newspaper, recently rebranded The Hawk, is running a free contest to raise interest and gain followers. The aim of “Guess Who?” is to match the baby picture to the HHS staff member. Get the most right and win a $10 gift card to Dunkin Donuts. If there’s a tie, the winning entries will be put into a raffle and one will be picked at random.

It’s easy to enter. Visit our table during lunches April 12-16, follow us on Twitter (@HanoverHSHawks) and Instagram (@hanover-hawks-newspaper), or use the link below. It’ll take you to a Google form with pictures of the 10 teachers today and then 10 baby pics to try to identify.

The contest ends 3 pm April 16. Good luck!

https://forms.gle/op4vTV58VVgLYCiu8

Dread Nation: American History, with Zombies

By Mrs. McHugh

Zombie plagues have been the rage in TV, movies and books for years. But setting a Zombie plague during the American Civil War? Now that’s something new.

Justina Ireland turns historical fiction on its head with her two-book series Dread Nation. Titled Rise Up and Deathless Divide, the books explore the racial, social and economic impacts of the ‘War Between the States’ and give new meaning to the term Reconstruction, the period of rebuilding and reunifying society after the war’s end. While no book involving zombies can be historically accurate, the stories build on the real people, events and issues of the time to highlight the brutality of slavery and the inequality that remained as the country moved forward – and westward. As the author explains in her notes, she wrote the books to give voice to characters often left out of history.

The books focus on Jane and Katherine, two Black teens taken from their homes after the dead begin to rise during the Battle of Gettysburg. Like other children of their race, they are deemed inferior – and therefore expendable – and sent to boarding schools that train them to protect rich whites from the undead. (These boarding schools resembled the facilities that Native Americans were sent to in the 1800s, when the U.S. government stole their land and forced their assimilation) The girls excel in their training, but before they can be assigned to protect society ladies, they uncover a sinister plot to build a “utopia” to replace the Eastern cities falling to the zombie plague. This new community is founded on the principles of Jim Crow, the discriminatory laws that rose to continue the oppression of Blacks after slavery was abolished. This means Blacks have no rights and are assigned the most dangerous jobs and the worst living conditions.

Tough-hearted and quick to temper, Jane resolves not just to survive, but to find an escape. Light-skinned and able to pass as White, Katherine plays along with the cruel society in order to help Jane’s plan to secure their freedom. There are tense battles, sorrowful deaths, cruel betrayals, heart-wrenching romances and epic friendships. And that’s just in book one. In the second book, the main characters venture west. Alive but forever changed, one seeks safety and peace while the other pursues vengeance.

The books are a unique way to explore the issues of American history including slavery and Reconstruction, the government’s treatment of Native Americans, the cultural clashes that came with waves of immigration, expansion of the western frontier, and the search for the “American dream.” But if you aren’t really interested in the history, the books aren’t slowed down by it. The series provides enough action and adventure for any reader.

New Stores Offer chance to volunteer, shop for a good cause

By Grace Van Duyn, ’22

Staff Writer

With the pandemic, many of us have felt the extreme consequences that come with all of this isolation and change. We have had to alter our lives in numerous ways as parts of our normal routines have become impossible. But, as this pandemic progresses, we are finding new ways to ease back to normalcy. As we begin to do things like open up schools and resume sport seasons, I think it is also important that we try to get back to doing community service too. 

In normal circumstances, Hanover High School requires all students to perform at least 10 hours of community service per year. With the requirement waived for this year, pretty much everyone I talked to has not been volunteering. But according to my guidance counselor, any hours we perform now can be counted toward next year. So, if you find yourself wanting to get a head start for the upcoming year, or if you’re interested in finding new ways to get involved in the community, check out the Cardinal Cushing stores.

In December, Cardinal Cushing opened up its new storefronts at 405 Washington Street in Hanover. The marketplace is the result of a five-year, $10 million building project that expands the Cardinal Cushing campus and provides the students with new opportunities. I have volunteered there before, and I asked them about the opportunities they are offering during the pandemic. While the students at Cardinal Cushing continue to work through the pandemic, they stay more behind the scenes. The school relies on volunteers to be up close with customers during business hours. If you are interested in volunteering, this might be something to pursue further.

But even if you are not interested in volunteering, buying anything from the Cardinal Cushing shops goes to an amazing cause, and helps them to build upon what they like to call their “neighborhood.” The Cushing Cafe is known for its delicious coffee and scones, and is open from 9 am-1 pm Monday through Friday. In addition to coffees and drinks, it is also a great place to stop in for a quick lunch. They often have special meals and treats for holidays like their delicious cookies at Christmas. The Unique Boutique, a gift shop filled with one-of-a-kind jewelry and art, is open weekdays from 10 am-2 pm and is a great place for anyone looking for unique art pieces. They also have many seasonal items that make great gifts. In addition, there is a thrift store called Take 2, also open weekdays 10 am- 2 pm. With thrift shopping being trendy, especially among our age group, many thrift stores can seem picked through. But the Cardinal Cushing thrift store is a hidden gem that anyone who likes thrifting should check out. Lastly, they not only are sustainable by refurbishing old clothes in their thrift store, but they also have a greenhouse too. 

Cardinal Cushing’s new storefronts offer both shoppers and volunteers such a great variety of ways to get involved with things they are passionate about or want to explore.    

Life’s a Beach (and Ocean) for Ms. Emerson

By Ashley Stracco, ’24

Staff Writer

Ms. Shayle Emerson teaches college prep Biology, Marine Biology, and honors Anatomy and Physiology at Hanover High School. Her favorite class to teach is Marine Biology because she loves to take students on field trips to explore the beaches and to see the aquarium in Boston. You can find her in room 215!

Born in Salem, NH, Ms. Emerson graduated from the University of New Hampshire. She played intramural sports including field hockey. One summer, she was able to take a scientific diver course at the Isle of Shoals for two weeks, and it was an amazing experience.  She became a teacher because she wanted to teach students about the ocean and the animals that live in it.

Her favorite television show is currently “WandaVision,” but she also likes to watch YouTube. Her favorite book is The Perfect Storm by Sebastian Junger, a true story about a swordfishing boat that gets trapped in the storm of the century.

Ms. Emerson’s favorite memory from high school is playing the trumpet in the band because it was huge and she had a lot of friends in it. They participated in many marching competitions, and tons of parades. Her band marched in the Rose Bowl and Fiesta Bowl, and also went to Disney!

She loves to travel, and has been to Paris and, recently, the Dominican Republic. She also visits Anchorage, Alaska, frequently because her twin sister lives there. She has three daughters, ages 11, 8, and 3.

In February 2020, Ms. Emerson launched a school trip to the Dominican Republic – and she’ll be doing it again next year! On the trip, students work with local organizations to clean beaches and restore coral reef. Each day begins around 7am, and you will not go to bed until after 11pm. The people in the DR were very kind and caring and the country was perfectly safe, she said. There is music playing everywhere you go there. It was an amazing experience, so stop by to see her or send her an email if you’d like to learn more.

Girls Basketball Reigns over League, Pandemic

By Ava Toner, ’22

Staff Writer

Photo by Robin Chan, Patriot Ledger

She shoots … She scores!!! The girls’ basketball team won the Patriot League Championship this season despite the uncertainty this year has presented. The tournament run, capped by a 50 – 43 win over Whitman- Hanson in the final, was a massive turnaround from last season when they got knocked out in the first round of playoffs. For junior Dani Tilden, the success could be attributed to “changing positions of starters this year” and “being more committed.” She was at the gym twice a day to shoot.  Mckalah Gaine, a junior, said the team’s increased “preparation before each game” and “drive because we all wanted to win” led to this season’s major success. 

Due to COVID, only minor details of game play were altered including no coin tosses, tipoffs or passing the ball in from underneath the hoop. However, the pandemic had a huge impact on the social impact of the sport. There were no team dinners or locker rooms and seats were assigned on the bus trips. But the girls managed to overcome these obstacles and still maintain a connection on the court, which became apparent as their games grew more competitive. Group chats and joking at practices helped the team bond, Gaine said. The girls’ commitment and teamwork was able to completely transform the squad from underdogs to champions. 

HHS Athletics

This season included a milestone for Coach Brian Fisher, who on Jan. 25 racked up his 200th career win. He and his father, Bob, have more than 860 wins between them.

Sadly, the team will be losing many key seniors, including captains Emily Flynn and Clare Connolly, but they are hopeful that they can adapt to their changing lineup and are excited to see what new talent will be coming next year.

 

Featured image: https://goccusports.com/news/2020/10/1/sun-belt-releases-mens-basketball-conference-schedule.aspx

Hanover Soars into New Era with Hawks Mascot

By Abby Van Duyn, ’24

Staff Writer

School and professional sports teams that use Native American mascots have grown more controversial in recent years. After years of criticism that their team name was offensive, the Washington Redskins of the National Football League retired their mascot in July and spent the season known as the Washington Football Team. In December, the Cleveland Indians pro baseball team announced plans to phase out its name, its logo featuring a red-faced cartoon chief, and the “tomahawk chop” often used as a rally cry by its fans.

The debate came to a head in Hanover last year when the community began to look at its symbol, the Indian, which has represented the schools for decades. Some people in Hanover argued that the Indian mascot was disrespectful as well as historically inaccurate, while others believed that it was a long-standing town tradition that honored our local Native American heritage. For many, the symbol – rendered in recent years as a blue and gold H with a Native American headdress – was a source of pride that united generations of students. When people thought of the “Hanover Indian,” they thought of so many winning athletes and sports teams over many years. 

After much debate, the School Committee voted to retire the mascot in August of 2020. The change to team uniforms and school logos has been estimated to cost up to $100,000, but district officials stated that they were persuaded after hearing from local Native Americans and students who felt that the old mascot was problematic. The decision kicked off a months-long effort to choose a new mascot that included more than 400 submissions such as the Anchors, the United, the Hornets, and the Huskies. On New Year’s Day 2021, the school district announced the new selection: the Hanover Hawks.

After a couple of months to get used to the change, many students approve. 

“I definitely like the new mascot,” said freshman Izzy Maclellan, “and it makes me feel better that we have a new mascot that isn’t offensive to a culture.”

“I like the Hanover Hawks because of the alliteration,” said Maeve Sullivan, a sophomore. “I think it sounds nice.” 

“I wish it was the Huskies but I’m glad we changed from the Indians because I never realized how offensive and disrespectful it was,” said Sam Curtis, a freshman.

Other students aren’t happy with the change.

“I think that with everything that happened last year, the (George Floyd racism) riots and stuff, that our mascot has just been a positive representation of different races,” said freshman Abby Smith. “We represent the Indians who lived in Massachusetts, and it feels wrong to change it because we were representing someone in a positive way.” 

COVID Infects Favorite TV Shows

By Kylie Campbell, ’22

Staff Writer

After the COVID-19 outbreak in March 2020, the world came to a stop. That included the filming of many fan-favorite TV shows. As people’s lives around the world changed dramatically, families spent more time indoors. People watched a lot more television, increasing their anticipation for new episodes of their favorite shows. Finally last summer, with social distancing and daily testing, many television shows and movies resumed filming. New seasons of popular shows came back this year including “Grey’s Anatomy” and “This Is Us.” These two shows, like many others, surprised fans by incorporating Covid-19 storylines. Fans had differing views on whether or not they liked this approach.

As a long-time supporter of “Grey’s Anatomy,” I was disappointed to see the virus incorporated into the show. I usually watch TV as an outlet from the real world. Especially since Covid-19 has increased stress and anxiety, I would have preferred a show that didn’t remind me of our world’s current situation. Although “Grey’s Anatomy” is a medical show and wanted to try to depict the lives of health care workers, I was disappointed to see the depressing cycle of death caused by Covid-19 to be portrayed in my favorite show. 

I also have been a strong supporter of the show “This is Us” throughout the last couple years but I have shied away from the very realistic season they have created for 2021. I feel as though incorporating the virus takes away from the intense storylines about the Pearson family which have built up over the past seasons . Although I believe real-world issues are an important aspect to be addressed, I feel as though they now have taken away from the original plot of the show. 

Even though I disliked Covid-19 being brought into these shows, some people found it reassuring to find their favorite fictional characters coping with the virus as well. And some good came from it. In “Grey’s Anatomy,” beloved characters who had left earlier in the show were able to come back due to Covid-19’s existence. 

New Library Books Offer Great Stories, Diverse Perspectives

Mrs. McHugh

I’d need at least a million dollars to buy all of the books I’d like for the library. Each month, I read reviews of the latest releases, and I add to my ever-growing wishlist the titles that I think students might enjoy – or might benefit from. But even though the Hanover High library is thankfully well-funded, there’s never enough money for all of them. When I buy new books, I have to prioritize, and I’m usually drawn toward ones that are not just good stories or sources of information, but also shine a light on diverse perspectives. In recent years, I’ve purchased a lot of titles about African Americans, the LGBTQ community, immigrants and refugees. Reading can be an escape from real life, but it also can be a great way to learn about new people, places and things you haven’t experienced  If I find a book that broadens a reader’s world, while also keeping them engaged, I consider my mission accomplished. These five very different titles fit the bill.

Sadie by Courtney Summers is a thriller about a teenaged girl who seeks revenge on the man that killed her little sister. As you learn about her quest, told from her point of view and that of a journalist investigating the case for a podcast, you see the dark impact of poverty, drug use and child abuse. It’s a mystery that highlights the dire circumstances many Americans are mired in. If you read this, let me know what you think of the ending. I hear the audiobook is pretty cool too.

A Land of Permanent Goodbyes by Atia Abawi is a fictional story about a teenaged boy fleeing Syria after years of civil war. Written by a journalist, herself a refugee from Afghanistan as a child, the story makes real the news stories we may read – or pass by – about the thousands of people displaced by violence.  These refugees lose their homes, possessions and loved ones only to trek to other places that may not let them in. If a country does accept them, they still struggle to find jobs, homes, and their place in a foreign land. This story is partially told by Destiny, similar to how The Book Thief by Marcus Zusak is narrated by Death. It’s an interesting way to make one boy’s experience more universal.

Clap When You Land by Elizabeth Acevedo is the latest novel from the highly popular author who wrote The Poet X and With the Fire on High. She focuses on the experiences of Dominican teens in the U.S., often torn between the traditions and expectations of two very different cultures. They also face stereotypes and obstacles that come with being immigrants and people of color. Even if a reader can’t find the Dominican Republic on a map, they can still relate to teens who feel pressured to do well in school, fulfill their parents’ expectations and struggle with relationships.

The Silence Between Us by Alison Gervais is about a deaf teen who transitions back to a traditional school when her mom’s job moves them across the country. A senior with big dreams of college, Maya struggles to fit in with her hearing peers who don’t understand that while she’s limited, she’s also very capable. This novel gives a glimpse into deaf culture, a community that relies on its own rich language (American Sign Language) and believes being deaf has qualities and benefits worth celebrating – and certainly not just fixing. It’s an enlightening perspective for many of us unfamiliar with the experiences of the hearing impaired. 

Everything Sad is Untrue (A True Story) by Daniel Nayeri is a quirky and wonderful book that I hope finds its audience. Based on the author’s life, the novel follows Khosrou and his family as they flee religious intolerance in Iran and end up in Oklahoma. The boy, highly influenced by the Arabian Nights and other stories from his homeland, spins tales for his new classmates about who he feels he is (smart, worldly, brave) versus what he seems to be (poor, smelly, weird). As a narrator, Khosrou is informal and irreverent, flipping between the present and past, with frequent tangents that have you feeling like you’re sitting beside him in conversation. Through his stories, you get a sense of his rich, complicated life in Iran, the strangeness of becoming a refugee, and the resilience needed to live through both.

The Travails of the Turkey on Main and Plain

By Norah Kelley, ’24

Staff Writer

Stan, the turkey who has been hanging out on Main Street and Plain Street for the past few weeks, has been causing traffic and making a scene. Almost every day around the time that school gets out, Stan likes to stand in the middle of the road and stare down cars. He was a pain when we first saw him, but he seems to have grown on everyone and become part of the community. 

This turkey has gotten a lot of recognition on town Facebook pages, but not as much as he gets while he stands in the street. Many people on Hanover Connect have mentioned this turkey, and he was even suggested to be the new school mascot! (Sadly, he lost out to the more regal and intimidating hawk) Community members have suggested a few other names for the turkey, including Joe, but it seems like Stan is sticking. 

I have seen Stan many times because he is normally right in front of my house, or on top of my dad’s pickup truck. He even has been seen on the power lines like a tightrope walker. 

People have beeped at Stan, and even gotten out of their car to shoo him away, but he keeps coming back. The beeping and yelling don’t get him out of the street, but seem to encourage him. I think this weird turkey loves the attention. Police officers have driven down Main Street and put on their sirens to try to get Stan out of the road, but that doesn’t work either. Many have pulled up just inches from Stan, but he stands his ground and won’t budge. The only thing that seems to work is to get out of your car and run at him until he moves into the safety of someone’s front yard. 

Many in Hanover have grown to love seeing Stan when they are driving home from school or work. At first, he was a pain to everyone, standing in the middle of the road annoying drivers who just wanted to get where they needed to be. But now whenever he is seen, at least for me and my family, we smile. He brings a little humor into some long COVID-19 days.

Please, don’t hurt Stan. This strange turkey just wants some attention, so please drive around him. And remember, beeping doesn’t get him out of the street, so if you’re in a hurry, you’re going to have to get out of your car and chase him away – or wait for another brave person to do it!

Saying Goodbye to a Beloved Pet

By Mrs. McHugh

My house has been compared to a zoo for all the animals we’ve brought into our lives. Stop by these days and you’ll be greeted by two dogs, two cats, and an axolotl (Google it, it’s cool!). At different points in her life, my daughter has asked for a Flemish giant rabbit – which she got – and a pony, a miniature donkey and a therapy duck – which she did not get. Needless to say, we’re a family that loves animals. But one of the biggest challenges of bringing so many pets into your lives is losing them, watching them get sick, watching them grow old, having to say goodbye. We are facing that now with our 12-year-old dog Carly.

Everyone thinks their dog is the best, but Carly truly is. A terrier mix rescued from Puerto Rico, she was a year old and already a mother when we adopted her in 2010. We had been searching for a dog for months, one that would accept hugs from my daughter, then six, without biting her face off or running away to hide. We walked by Carly’s kennel in the shelter several times looking at other dogs. Finally, in frustration that other dogs weren’t the right fit, we gave her a try. She stood calmly at the kennel gate waiting for a leash, and then let us pet and play with her in the yard. We brought her home that day. Our lives were so much richer thanks to that decision.

A lapdog from day one, Carly spoiled us as pet owners. Never a barker, chewer or jumper – unless a squirrel was in sight -Carly loved every dog and person she met. She wasn’t super playful and definitely didn’t care to play fetch, preferring more to observe from the sidelines or cuddle up to the humans. But she let my daughter dress her, carry her, and hug her for years. She put up with the cats and was kind to the rabbit. She never needed training (which made our adoption a year ago of a 16-week-old puppy a huge shock). Even when she begged for people food, she’d do it politely and calmly. How could you resist those big brown eyes?

We loved her so much, made her such a part of our lives, that my family worked for several years to get a dog park built in my town. After three years of fund-raising, rallying the community and finding grants, the Abington Dog Park opened in August 2019. Of course, imagine our surprise when Carly decided a dog park wasn’t her thing. She was 10 years old at that point, so we couldn’t really blame her. She was tolerant beyond any reasonable expectation when we brought that puppy, Natasha, home in November 2019 – when she would have been within her rights to be mad at us for bringing this loud,  unruly creature into her life. But she took it in stride, as she took everything in stride.

In December, after noticing that she was lethargic for a couple of days, we took her to the vet, who diagnosed her with cancer of the spleen. She needed emergency surgery and weeks of recovery. It was heartbreaking to see her so sick, and I’m grateful we could afford her care. Finally, she returned to her usual self – bouncing along on walks, taking up half the bed, waiting patiently for a pizza crust or a French fry. She even ran and played with the younger dogs. The vet recommended chemotherapy, and she was tolerating it well. Until earlier this week, when we noticed her wincing as she jumped off the couch or into the car. We took her to the vet, thinking she’d need some pain medicine for arthritis, but they found that cancer had spread to her liver. We started palliative care, which means medication to keep her comfortable, and will probably only have another month or so with her.

We’ve lost small animals before – cats and the rabbit – and that’s been hard, but losing Carly feels so much worse. We brought her home for my daughter’s 6th birthday. This April will be 11 years since that day. She’s grown up with my girl, who’s now a junior in high school and thinking about college.  She’s carved a huge spot in our family and in our hearts.  We’ve cried, of course. We’ve reassured ourselves that we gave her a great life, and will continue to do so until her final day. When she’s  in pain, and no longer able to enjoy life, we’ll do what needs to be done. I don’t think I’ll be able to express myself then.

Pets bring so much joy to our lives – companionship, unconditional love, exercise, security, even therapy. The downside of the package is that, someday, we have to lose them. It breaks our hearts. But I know many of us wouldn’t give up a moment we’ve had with them, despite the inevitable outcome.

Carly  has enriched my life and made me a more loving person. Because of her, I became a community activist and “dog park lady.” I found space in my heart that I didn’t know was there. The organization that rescued Carly from Puerto Rico and sent her to the Northeast Animal Shelter, where we found her, is called Save a Sato. But this “sato,” or street dog, really saved me.

Update: Carly passed away on March 3, 2021