Category Archives: News

Student Club Spreads Easter Cheer

By Ashley Stracco, ’24

Contributor

Have you ever wanted to give back to the community, but you just did not know how? The Outreach Club found a way. They made it their goal to spread as much Easter cheer and love to the community as possible, by acting as assistants to the Easter Bunny. This past weeked, members of the club, along with some friends from other schools, put together 43 Easter baskets for children in Friends of the Homeless shelters and for the Hanover Food Pantry. In addition, they created 100 Easter treat bags for senior citizens in need.

The Outreach Club previously completed a Valentine’s Day service project for the Hanover Senior Center, in which they made 100 treat packages full of candy, gift cards, and essential items. Those involved say the project made them feel like they were making a difference, and they wanted to get further involved, so they volunteered to help with the latest endeavor. 

The Easter project involved a great deal of organization, effort, and generosity. Supplies were very costly, and the club raised more than $2,000 from the community, which led to the project’s great success.

Hanover students who helped with this project include Ashley Stracco, ’24, founder and president of the Outreach Club; Brody Leibfarth, ’24, vice president of the club; Baylor Speckmann, ’24, treasurer of the club; Nunzio Minasi, ’24; Caden Fly, ’24; Thomas Perkins, ’25; Trevor Leibfarth, eighth grade and Chris Stracco, fourth grade. Students from other schools included Jack Faggiano, a junior from St. Sebastian’s; Anna Sheppard and Gabby Bethony, sophomores from Notre Dame Academy; Ciara Leonard, a freshman from South Shore Tech; Finn O’Gara, a junior from Marshfield; and Tommy Scully, a freshman from Norwell.

Hundreds of people benefited from this project, including the volunteers.

“It’s always great to help out those less fortunate than I am,” O’Gara said. “I was lucky enough to be blessed with friends and family in my life so I wanted to help out. It is truly humbling to make a difference in so many people’s lives.”

Brody Leibfarth, vice president of the club, was a great help to the project, which he said have been very rewarding.

“They make me a better person,” he said. “I’ve made so many great friends by doing these projects, and I truly have fun while helping the community at the same time.”                       

Treasurer of the Outreach Club, Baylor Speckmann, said he’s inspired by how the community comes together for these projects.

“It amazes me how many great people there are that donate their time, money, and effort into creating a better community for all,” he said. “It inspires me to try to be the best person I can and try to do my part as a citizen.”

Participating in projects like this is a great way to earn community service hours, and club members are already thinking about their next event. New members are always welcome, as helping the community truly has more benefits than you can imagine. If you would like to donate to, or participate in,  future projects, please email astracco24@hanoverstudents.org.

Drama Club Shines at METG Festival

The Hawk Staff

The HHS Drama Club received rave reviews for its performance in the Massachusetts Educational Theatre Guild’s Drama Festival at Duxbury High School on March 19. Presenting the one-act play Badger by Don Zolidis, the cast and crew performed brilliantly with individual awards going to stage manager Karen Bell, actors Ben Manning and Morgan Gentile, choreographer Callia Gilligan and musical composer Jacob Asnes. While the show will not be moving to the next round, the cast and crew did a fantastic job representing HHS.

the 2022 METG logo designed by Jashia Sikder of Brockton High School

The METG Drama Festival is an annual theatrical competition. Schools gather together and each presents a 40-minute one-act piece, with just 5 minutes to put together and strike, or take down, their sets. At the end of the day, each play is scored and three winners are named. Drama Festival is a wonderful and exciting day, an event that HHS Drama annually participates in. 

In the past, HHS has presented shows such as The Scheme of the Driftless Shifter, an over-the-top comedy. In 2019, the club advanced to the semi-finals with its production of At the Bottom of Lake Missoula. Last year, due to the pandemic, the festival was moved to a virtual presentation. Hanover still participated with 4 A.M. by Johnathon Dorf, submitting a video of the performance. 

This year’s play Badger focused on four women working in a munitions factory during World War II and the challenges they faced as women in the workforce. It is both a heartbreaking and uplifting story that paints a strong picture of the hardships of domestic life during the war. 

The cast was led by Sammy Burke (‘22) as Rose, Gentile (‘22) as Irene, Lauren Casey (‘22) as Grace, and Caris Mann (‘22) as Barbara. Manning (‘22) played Tim, another factory worker who takes an interest in Rose, and Rose Giordani (‘22) played Barbara’s husband, John, who is overseas fighting. The Chorus included Erin Shea (‘23), Kendall Sherwood (‘22), Mary Longueil (‘22), Paulina Leskow (‘24), Addy Potter (‘24), Bella MacDonald (‘24) and Kaya Biunculli (‘23). The Chorus is the backbone of the show, taking on various characters and roles within the factory. 

Rehearsals began before the fall musical was even complete, under the direction of Mr. Fahey and the stage management of Bell (‘22) and Paulina Leskow (‘24). Asnes (’25) composed original music for the play. A performance for the HHS community on March 17 served as a final rehearsal before competition.

A New Epidemic Strikes Seniors

By Callia Gilligan, ’22

Staff Writer

As winter rolls into spring here at Hanover High School, the mysterious disease known as “Senioritis” has officially fallen upon the Class of 2022. 

Scientists are unsure if Senioritis is a virus or infection, but common symptoms are lack of motivation, fallen grades, tiredness, and overall apathy for all things school-related. Usually, Senioritis falls around the spring and has been known to only increase in symptoms as Graduation comes closer. 

Senioritis can manifest in different ways. 

Tiana Wakefield said that she suffers most from a lack of motivation. “I can’t bring myself to do work anymore, and I think that’s everyone too.”

McKenzie Bottomley doubted the existence of the sickness when she was an underclassman, but now says, “Senioritis is real, I’m literally just staring at this paper right now. I literally can’t bring myself to even read my notes.”

Jack Dolan couldn’t even give me a quote because “that’s how little I care right now.” 

Even the projected valedictorian and class brainiac, Bella Kelley, has taken ill. “I feel like I’m feeling it,” she said. “I feel like I’m still keeping up with all my classes but we’re definitely getting closer to the end.” 

Senioritis, interestingly, seems to be in direct conflict with the work of teachers, who have frustratingly taken notice of the widespread symptoms plaguing the Class of 2022. 

“Late. Absent. Tardy. Missing. Is there anything else to say?” Mrs. Curtis stated. “Senioritis”

Mrs. Galotti noted in her sixth-period Calculus class that the disease was “definitely affecting this class” but stopped to tell talking students to “do some math.” She added, “this is not my favorite time of year.”

Even teachers who do not teach seniors like Mr. Perry said, “From what I’ve heard, Senioritis is a problem. It seems to start earlier every year.” 

Clearly many teachers are frustrated by the yearly apathy that strikes the Senior Class but some aren’t too concerned. 

“I think we should wait nine or so weeks and it will all blow over,” said Mr. Henderson. Coincidentally, in nine weeks, the seniors are done with school. 

https://www.metroparent.com/education/school-issues/symptoms-cures-senioritis-high-school-seniors/

Many are connecting the Senioritis plaguing the high school to the Coronavirus pandemic. 

“I’ve had senioritis since COVID started,” said Emma Talbot. 

Could Senioritis really be pandemic fatigue? Mr.Fahey doesn’t think so. “Senioritis is a disease that gets contracted by students the very first year they come to high school and meet their first senior,” he said.

If you find yourself feeling ill with Senioritis, doctors recommend prioritizing assignments that you might actually like, so you can bring some enjoyment back into your schoolwork.  If you feel yourself still struggling with motivation, doctors also recommend reminding yourself that colleges can revoke your offer of admission if you fail your classes. If even this doesn’t work, you should cut your losses and enjoy your nap. 

With college applications completed, Graduation looming on the horizon, and the weather warming up, can you really blame seniors for wanting to take a break? As Mr.Fahey put it, “Senioritis is earned.” Seniors have worked hard to get to this point, so as long as we keep up the good work (or at least some work), we deserve to slow down and enjoy this last stretch of our high school career. 

Featured image: https://www.scholarships.com/news/tips-for-curing-senioritis

HHS Group Takes Long-Delayed Trip of a Lifetime

By Paulina Leskow, ’24

Staff Writer

After a year of delay due to the outbreak of the coronavirus, a group of Hanover High School students finally got to take the trip of a lifetime: visiting the mysteries and wonders of Peru. Led by Spanish teachers Mrs. Gately and Mrs. Aborn, seven other students and I were able to experience the extraordinary Lima, the mountainous Cusco, and the mesmerizing Machu Picchu. 

The trip began February 18th, with some unfortunate mishaps. The plane from Boston to Miami, which would connect us to a flight from Miami to Lima, broke down before taking off, so we were all forced to deplane until it was fixed. This delay, which was expected to last about two hours, lasted 11 hours! We used that time to walk around the airport and buy snacks and beverages. Mrs. Gately and Mrs. Aborn remained calm through it all, figuring out how to get a new flight to Lima once we eventually arrived in Miami. 

At the gate for the flight to Lima, Peru

Once we landed in Miami, we had dinner in the airport since there were four more hours until the new flight to Lima. When we made our  way to the check in gate, we discovered another problem: the Boston airline messed up the tickets and ended up not buying all the necessary seats for the upcoming flight. After another 45 minutes trying to figure out ticketing, we were finally set and had to run to the gate, just barely catching the flight to Lima at 1 in the morning. 

After 27 hours in various airports, we finally met up with Boris, our tour guide, and arrived at the Lima hotel about an hour before our first tour. When we thought nothing else could go wrong, it was revealed that our checked luggage was stuck in Miami and would not arrive for another two days!

Despite all of the travel struggles, we were ready to enjoy our trip. During a guided tour of Lima, we were fascinated by the beautiful museums, catacombs (containing the bones of Fransisco Pizarro among others), and the President’s house, which was so close to other buildings that it didn’t even seem like his house.

Senior Daniel Leskow in front of the Presidential House, home of Pedro Castillo (current President of Peru)

The people indigenous to Lima are very friendly, however they did as much as they could to make the travelers buy their products. Although that seems a little stressful, the crafts and other items were fascinating and the people were very willing to negotiate. Overall, Lima is a beautiful place filled with rich Peruvian culture. 

The next day, we took a flight to the wondrous mountains of Cusco, where luggage was waiting for all but two members of the group. Cusco has an elevation of 11,000 feet so many can suffer high altitude sickness. Mrs. Gately and I were among the unlucky ones, forced to miss a day of the tour but fully recovered the next day. During our two days in Cusco, we hiked some of the beautiful mountains, explored the ancient ruins of Incan Civilization, and ate some of the best meals we’ve ever had (including the famous sweet Chicha Morada beverage). At one marketplace we visited, the local people were so happy to see tourists that they invited us to join in a traditional Peruvian dance. It was so much fun singing and dancing with them.

New friends at the marketplace in Cusco

Next, the group boarded a train to our final destination and the climax of our journey: Machu Picchu, one of the Seven Wonders of the World. The train took about two hours and followed along a river and through incredible mountains. We were fascinated by the views we had from the glass ceilings of the train.

Señora Aborn smiling at the top of Machu Picchu!

Machu Picchu is a beautiful village, and it takes a 20 minute bus ride to reach the Incan ruins. The route consists of many twists and turns all along the mountainside. Once the bus reached the top of the mountain, we were in awe at the gorgeous scenery of Machu Picchu. This was my favorite part of the trip.

After a day exploring the ruins, which date to the 15th century, we took a train and flight back to Lima for our trip home. Our final night consisted of one last dinner and dessert, a workout at the gym, card games, and lots and lots of packing, trying to fit all their souvenirs in the luggage. 

The flight home went pretty smoothly, at least better than the trip to Lima. Although we were happy to come home to our families, all of us wished that we could have stayed in Peru just a bit longer.

Señora Gately with a local vendor at a Cusco marketplace

“Peru was more than just a vacation for me – it was an adventure, a check off my bucket list and the trip of a lifetime,” said Mrs. Gately. “I was not only awed by the truly magnificent beauty of the Andes Mountains and its surroundings but also the mathematical and engineering geniuses that were the Incan people.”

Dan Leskow, a senior, said his favorite part of the trip was visiting Machu Picchu. “I was just in awe of how incredible it was,” he said. “I was additionally thrilled to be able to try unique Peruvian foods such as Ceviche, alpaca meat, and of course Cuy (Guinea Pig). It was truly a once in a lifetime experience.”

Senior Andrew Corbo created a video of the experience using some of the hundreds of pictures he and the other travelers took.

This really was one of the best trips I have ever taken. Thank you to everyone who made this trip so wonderful and memorable. It is an experience I will never forget.

Seniors Andrew Corbo, Ray Tschudy, Dan Leskow and Sophomore Paulina Leskow in front of the LIMA sign.

Graduating Senior Offers Tips for College Application Season

By Natalie Mowbray, ’22

Staff Writer

Although the fall of a new school year typically brings excitement and new beginnings, it can also be a time of great stress for seniors. As many of you know, this time of year sparks the beginning of the college application season. Between narrowing down lists, filling out applications and working on essays, it can seem overwhelming. As I just finished this process myself, I’m sharing some advice on how next year’s seniors can make this time of year less worrisome and more enjoyable.

For the majority of high school students, summer vacation is seen as the time of year with the least amount of responsibilities and stressors. But if you’re heading into senior year, take advantage of the opportunity that summer offers! As fall approaches, many seniors face the most rigorous course load of their entire high school career. To avoid an overlap between applications and school work, summer is a great time to get started on your application to-do list.

  • Begin writing your college essay over the summer. During the fall of senior year, you will spend your English classes editing and finalizing your essay. For the best results, come into senior year English with a pretty solid draft. You can get topic ideas and sample prompts from the Common App and writing tips from online sources such as Khan Academy.
  • The Common App opens on August 1st. Used by more than 900 colleges, the common app is a must for most students. Creating an account is straightforward and the majority of the information can be completed prior to senior year. This way, it will be faster to apply to all of your colleges. Your guidance counselor will hold senior workshops to help you complete the common application, so don’t forget to check your email!
  • Finalize your college list. To make the application season smoother, finalize which colleges you’re interested in attending. Don’t forget to include a range of schools, from those where you’re likely guaranteed admission to those that may be a reach. Although there is nothing wrong with including schools that might be out of your range, it is important to include schools that you should be admitted to and would attend. To sense which schools fall into these categories, the admission scatterplot on the platforms Naviance or Scoir will help. This data is limited to only HHS applicants which gives better and more personalized information.
  • Secure at least two letters of recommendation. One should preferably be from a STEM teacher and the other teacher should be a humanities teacher. Additionally, try to find a teacher that taught you during your junior year of high school. Although it is best to ask in person before the end of junior year, it is also acceptable to ask over the summer. Just ensure that the teacher knows your first college deadline – often. November 1st for many early applicants – so that you can apply on time.
  • Keep your grades up! It is a common misnomer that senior year grades are not important. However, poor senior grades or grades that have declined from your usual performance can negatively impact your chance at admission. Sometimes, you can be deferred from or are a borderline candidate for some colleges. Having exceptional grades during terms 1 and 2 can give you the boost needed to be accepted.

Although this portion of high school can be especially stressful, try not to be discouraged or overwhelmed. The guidance department is always available if you have questions or need help with applications. Speaking for myself, I went to guidance on numerous occasions to help me narrow down my list and write my college essays. Just remember you are not alone in this stressful task. Senior year is often cited as people’s favorite time at HHS, so don’t forget to cherish the last memories of high school while focusing on what will come next!

Featured image: https://www.collegetransitions.com/blog/college-application-season-is-here

First Live Show in Two Years is the Comic Relief We All Needed

By Norah Kelley, ’24

Staff Writer

Hilarious. Stunning cast. Amazing performance.

These were some of the comments from audience members who attended the HHS Drama Club presentation of Spamalot the Musical Feb. 11-13. For each of the three performances, the first live shows at HHS in two years, the theater was filled with family, friends, teachers, and students. 

Rehearsals began in November for the show, based on the 1975 movie Monty Python and the Holy Grail. Led by Mr. Fahey, Mr. Wade and Mr. Harden, the cast and crew put in many long hours to make the show a success.

“Spamalot was an incredible return to the stage for HHS Drama!” said Mr. Wade, the Vocal Director. “Students performed, ran tech, and played in the pit band, which showcased all of the talent and skill the performing arts has here at HHS.

“All together,” he added, “this was an amazing team effort that resulted in a creative, wacky and fun-filled production that our community greatly appreciated.”

Sammy Burke, a senior in the cast, said the experience was one she’ll never forget.

“I had so much fun in Spamalot,” she said. “The music was so much fun to learn and will be forever stuck in my head.”

Olivia Morin, a sophomore cast member, called her time spent on Spamalot “awesome.”

“After not being in a production for two years because of Covid, it was really nice to be a part of something so fun and exciting!” she said. “Not only did I have so much fun getting to act, sing, and dance, but the cast and crew made it even more memorable.”

New members of the club found out what makes it so special, and many are excited to be a part of upcoming productions. 

 “This musical was just great and a funny experience, becoming close to everyone,” said Paulina Leskow, a sophomore in the cast. “I can’t wait to do more plays in the future!” 

Seniors in the cast were very sad that this was their last high school musical, but they ended with a bang and finished with an amazing and funny show that kept the audience laughing the whole time. 

“I am so glad I got to be a part of Spamalot!” said senior cast member Bella Kelley. “It was a super fun experience and I loved being part of such a funny production!”

As Mr. Wade said, “We look forward to continuing our successes on the stage here in years to come. Kudos & congratulations to all involved!” 

Some Schools Reach State Goal for Dropping Masks; HHS Not There Yet

By Paulina Leskow, ’24

Staff Writer

The year is now 2022. It has been almost two full years since our world shut down due to the coronavirus. The virus, however, has not stopped. With new variants continuing to emerge, the mask policy remains in effect in Hanover schools. Whether vaccinated or not, all students and staff must wear a mask in the school building and during sporting events. 

The new year brought about some new policies, which include the town of Hanover strongly recommending that people wear masks in common areas like restaurants. In addition, the state extended the mask mandate in schools until the end of February; it was initially set to expire in mid-January. The Centers for Disease Control has also shortened the quarantine time for asymptomatic people.

Although these are important policies, many would say the most significant one is that a school with 80 percent of students and staff fully vaccinated can go mask-free. Several schools in the surrounding area no longer require masks, including Norwell High School, Cohasset Middle School and Cohasset High School. Hanover High School is at 77 percent vaccinated, according to a recent email from Patricia Smith, the district’s director of health services. Cedar School, Center School, and Hanover Middle School vaccination rates are currently less than 60 percent, Mrs. Smith said. Once a school reaches the 80 percent mark required by the state, local officials can decide whether to drop or continue its mask mandate.

HHS students have differing opinions on masks at school.

“It would be safer to keep them on for a bit longer,” said junior Melissa Manning. “Even with everyone wearing masks, many people continue to get sick and having masks off would increase that rate of sickness.”

Another student, who asked to be anonymous, said that when enough people are vaccinated, Hanover schools should go mask-free. ”Once we hit that vaccination rate, those who received the vaccine will be protected, and those who did not can choose to either wear a mask or face the consequences of the virus,” the student said.

No matter what opinions you have about the vaccine, masks, and the coronavirus, it is always important to stay safe and help keep yourself and others healthy. The school district continues to administer pool testing and has begun at-home testing for students and staff who opt into that program.

Featured image: https://www.edweek.org/leadership/what-does-the-cdcs-new-mask-recommendation-mean-for-schools/2021/05

Prism Offers Story Contest for Writers, Artists

By Michael Greene, ’22

Staff Writer

Attention all HHS writers and artists!  Do you like telling creative stories?  Do you like making art?  If you do, then this is the perfect opportunity for you!  The Hanover High School literary magazine, The Prism, is holding a story prompt contest that will last until the end of January.  The contest gives students the opportunity to respond to an open-ended story prompt by either finishing the story or making unique artwork.  This year, the prompt is, “I don’t know how it happened, but it all began when …”

Once all participants have submitted, the top three winners will receive gift cards and be featured on the literary magazine’s website and in future print issues.

Happy writing!

To submit, please email theprism@hanoverstudents.org.  For any questions about the contest or the literary magazine, please contact Mr. Henderson (shenderson@hanoverschools.org) or Michael Greene (mgreene22@hanoverstudents.org).  You can also follow “The Prism” on Twitter @theprismhhs, and visit the magazine’s website at theprism.medium.com.

Featured image: https://neilpatel.com/blog/create-facebook-contest/

HHS Alumni Reflect on Transition to College

By Grace Van Duyn, ’22

Staff Writer

As I am a senior, I am so happy to be done with my college applications, and I know many of my classmates are too. But now that many of our college applications are submitted, we have the new struggle of waiting to hear back from the schools that we applied to, which turns out to be just as hard as completing the applications themselves. In addition to wondering where I will get accepted, I also have been trying to envision how I would do at the schools where I applied. It can be hard to get a realistic picture of college in your head when people only share the good parts on social media, and schools only share the positive aspects in their brochures. One of the best things that has helped me has been talking to previous Hanover High students about their experiences. I’ve compiled the responses of a few students in hopes that their experiences can help you too.

Tim Sullivan, Northeastern sophomore, HHS class of 2020

Question: Do you feel like HHS prepared you well for college? 

Yes! I think that HHS has some great offerings for classes and is only expanding the opportunities, especially with VHS classes. I would encourage students to use these opportunities to try out different classes in high school. It’s totally normal to head into college not knowing what you want to do but opportunities like this in high school can help you find a direction.

Question: What is the difference in workload compared to high school? 

Although coming to college and having a new workload is definitely challenging, some aspects are similar to how things were set up in high school. One thing that was different for me was that in college you generally have fewer assignments that are worth a large portion of your grade, and this means that it’s really important to be prepared, especially when a test can be something like 30 percent of your grade! Like everything, the workload is an adjustment, but it’s manageable.

Question: Is there anything that you miss about HHS, or any advice that you would give to current seniors? 

“I miss so much about HHS! I wish I could go back, especially before Covid, and just live a quick day in my life because I do miss it. Not to be cringey but seniors, just enjoy it! I know everyone looks forward to graduating and literally counts down the days, but this is such a great year, and you don’t want to rush it.

Question: What types of students do you think do best at Northeastern? 

“I wouldn’t say that there’s one specific type of student that would excel here over another type, but I will say that everyone has a different experience at college. It’s important to reach out to current students to get the general vibe of a school, but definitely remember that everyone’s experience is unique and go with what feels right for you when thinking about where you fit best!”

Rachel Maccarrone, Suffolk University freshman, HHS Class of 2021

Question: Do you feel like HHS prepared you well for college? 

I think high school prepared me to an extent for college. Definitely prepared me socially, but college is different when you get to choose what you want to learn, and this taught me about time management and how much effort I needed to put in. Also, I would say that math was taught really well at HHS, and it prepared me for math in college.

Question: What is the difference in workload compared to high school?

“The course load depends on your major at Suffolk. In high school I felt like I could manage my work more than in college.”

Question: Is there anything that you miss about HHS, or any advice that you would give to current seniors? 

“I miss all of my friends from HHS and the fun moments. In terms of advice for seniors, I would say just make the most of it. Don’t take everything so seriously and focus on yourself.”

Question: What types of students do you think do best at Suffolk? 

“I believe that if you are hardworking in general, then you will do well anywhere. At Suffolk, you have to have a strong work ethic and confidence.”

Shannon Taylor, University of Rhode Island freshman, HHS class of 2021

Question: Do you feel like HHS prepared you well for college?

I would say that college is a lot more about taking notes in class. At HHS I did more in- class assignments, and now at URI I have to do a lot more of my work myself. You get used to it though, and I usually get homework on Monday and most of it is due Friday or Sunday which is helpful. 

Question: What is the difference in workload compared to high school?

I feel like college is a lot of work over longer periods of time which can be overwhelming, but if you have good time management, then you will get your work done on time and can make more of your own schedule than in high school. URI also has such a pretty campus, and whenever you are stressed with work, you can always walk around and enjoy that campus which is something really nice and unique!”

Ben Lee, Merrimack College junior majoring in Business, HHS class of 2019

Question: Do you feel like HHS prepared you well for college?

“I do think HHS prepared me well and gave me tools to succeed in college. I think teachers’ expectations in high school are somewhat skewed; they expect professors to be much less forgiving than they truly are. The first year I was in college, I found my expectations were far off from what college truly was, and that was an adjustment for me”

Question: What is the difference in workload compared to high school?

“I don’t find there to be a tremendous difference in workload. The big difference is in accountability. I have to do my work, they really don’t hunt you down to do it. The professors give you the tools and truly do want you to succeed and they care about you, but if you don’t want to pass the class, they don’t care nearly as much as high school teachers do.”

Question: Is there anything that you miss about HHS, or any advice that you would give to current seniors? 

“I don’t miss high school. I enjoyed it for what it was but I think by the time I left I had grown out of HHS.”

Ainsley Kane, Pace University sophomore majoring in health science/pre-nursing, HHS Class of 2020

Question: Do you feel like HHS prepared you well for college?

“I feel as though HHS helped me open up my shell a lot and learn how to meet new people and make connections. One thing that I expected coming into college was that I would have a tremendous amount of work and that professors wouldn’t be accommodating, which isn’t the case. I lucked out with my school and their priority for their students. I have built many connections with my professors and have been able to succeed even when I fall behind.”

Question: What is the difference in workload compared to high school?

“The workload itself is determined on the degree program, so as a health science major my workload mainly consists of writing research papers and studying rather than actual homework.”

Question: Is there anything that you miss about HHS, or any advice that you would give to current seniors? 

“I think the only thing I really miss about HHS would be all the little moments I shared that I didn’t appreciate enough. One piece of advice I would give is enjoy your time in high school don’t try and grow up too fast.”

Kaitlyn Cox, Elon University sophomore majoring in finance, HHS Class of 2020

Question: Do you feel like HHS prepared you well for college?

My situation is unique in the sense that I was only at HHS for senior year and with the pandemic, that year was actually only a few months. I feel like HHS prepared me for the switch in classes with the pandemic. The asynchronous work senior year helped me prepare to handle that same work in college.”

Question: What is the difference in workload compared to high school?

“I have noticed a significant difference. Now that I’m taking more classes geared towards my major, the workload is significantly increasing and I spend much more time working now than I did in high school.”

Question: Is there anything that you miss about HHS, or any advice that you would give to current seniors? 

“My college experience has been great and I don’t find myself missing high school too much because of that. In high school, I found myself stressing over every little thing (for really no reason) and college taught me that these little things are not important in the grand scheme of things. I wish I enjoyed high school more while it lasted and not stressed out so much.”

Hope Thurston, Salem State University majoring in political science, HHS Class of 2020

Question: Do you feel like HHS prepared you well for college? 

“Hanover prepared me academically definitely; I feel like I already know a lot of what I am taught in several of my courses. I also had a few teachers that influenced my passion for government and politics. In terms of the “real world,” culture shock was something I struggled with because we went to an incredibly wealthy and white high school. I didn’t really feel accepted ever and there are probably a lot of students right now struggling with that. Fortunately, there are very accepting people in the real world and I’ve come to meet them and grow into a better person for myself and others.”

Question: What is the difference in workload compared to high school?

“My workload isn’t too different. It’s a lot more studying and a lot more work that I actually can involve myself in. Professors are understanding and very flexible. They want you to succeed and will do anything to make that happen, as if they are your parents or your close friend. It’s motivating knowing that people really want you to succeed and do well at any cost.

Question: Is there anything that you miss about HHS, or any advice that you would give to current seniors? 

“I miss a few teachers, but I’m very glad that high school is over. Advice to seniors now is, it gets better and college is an amazing place.”

Featured image: Craig Warga | Bloomberg | Getty Images

Support the Seven Days of ‘Students as Santa’ Challenge!

Raising $40,000 for charity in seven days? That’s the goal of several Hanover High School groups who have joined for an ambitious fundraiser this holiday season.

The National Honor Society, Student Council and Class of 2025 are collaborating on the Seven Days of ‘Students as Santa’ Challenge, which officially kicks off today. Each member of these groups is tasked with getting at least 10 donors to contribute $20. The proceeds will benefit organizations distributing toys to local families, the Visiting Nurses Association, and the Hanover Food Pantry. Donations can be made to a GoFundMe campaign or given to students directly.

On the GoFundMe, donors are requested to select the school “team” they are supporting by choosing the student representative: McKenzie Bottomley for NHS, Caris Mann for Student Council and Catherine Reinhart for Class of 2025. While the event officially started today, the link went live yesterday and raised $1,000 in less than a day!

The fundraiser came together when student leaders realized the three different groups wanted to hold similar toy drives, said Mrs. Coates, who advises NHS along with Mrs. Collins. They believed, she added, that “we could make a bigger – huge, in fact – impact on local South Shore charities if we worked together.”

While the fundraising goal is ambitious, student leaders believe it’s within reach. “It’s a large number, but we did the math and with the number of people in these groups, it seems possible,” said McKenzie Bottomley, vice president of NHS. “It’s very exciting to think we’re going to have such a big impact on the community.”

To donate: https://gofund.me/de5f8f3c