Coping with the Pandemic: HHS Edition

By Caris Mann, ‘22

Staff Writer

On March 13, Hanover High and hundreds of other schools across the region sent their students home due to the Coronavirus pandemic. For the first two weeks, students were basically off while school officials figured out how to continue with classes. And even once classes resumed, sports, clubs and pretty much everything else were cancelled or closed. With all of this free time, students had to find new ways to keep themselves occupied. Here is what students at HHS did to cope:

“Played video games and did group calls” – Anthony Mann and Austin Parker, ‘24

“Watched new TV and played video games until restrictions were lifted. Once restrictions were lifted, I played baseball.” – Anonymous, ‘24

“I baked, danced, and watched The Crown on Netflix.”- Julia McGillivray, ‘22

“I watched a ton of Netflix, went on walks, and listened to podcasts.” – Katie McGillivray, ‘22

“Walked 8-12 miles a day” – Luke Hoyes, ‘22

“I walked my dog.” – Paige Dillis, ‘22

“I exercised, kept my room clean, and went on daily walks. Tik Tok kept me going!” – Molly McGlame, ‘22

“I did a lot of baking.” – Kylie Campbell, ‘22

“I exercised, kept my room clean, went on walks, and baked.” – Libby Hutchins, ‘22

“I took walks with my dog and worked out. I also went outside when it became warm and I just liked being in the sun.” – Natalie Mowbray, ‘22

“I went outside a lot when it wasn’t too cold and I worked out.” – Sydney Patch, ‘22

“I slept till 1pm everyday and exercised. I also redid my room, read, and watched a lot of TV.” – Ava Toner, ‘22

“I slept a lot, exercised, went outside, and baked.” – Meghan Enos, ‘22

“I made a bunch of friendship bracelets, went on long walks with my dog, and watched tons of Netflix!” – McKenzie Bottomley, ‘22

“I did a lot of self care whether that was meditation, yoga, face masks, reading a book, or having quiet time. I made time to speak to my really close friends and family on Facetime because I couldn’t really see them. I also found that when I created a schedule everyday, it felt a lot more normal.” – Kelsey Delprete, ‘22

“I got a dog which pretty much occupied most of my time. I also read a lot of books and did crafts” – Anonymous, ‘22

“Over quarantine, I started working out three days a week by doing home workouts that I found online. I watched all seven seasons of Gilmore Girls with my mom during the first two weeks we had off in March and I watched Outer Banks as well. I Facetimed my friends to keep up with them since that was the only way to talk to them. When I was bored, I’d learn how to sing a new song or I learned a new dance.” – Elise Falvey, ‘21

“For me, I’m a senior so going about the whole college application process was much more difficult than I expected it to be but colleges and guidance were able to provide a lot of helpful resources. Also, there are a lot of events and activities that our class missed out on so I’m hoping that we can reach some sense of normalcy for events such as prom and homecoming. I’m president of the student council and the secretary of our class so both boards have been working extremely hard to provide new opportunities. It’s been very hard for every grade but I think for our class especially. We have missed out on a lot so we’re relying on our friends a lot for support. My main mode of coping with the pandemic has been through finding things to work on so that I can feel accomplished. Also, something that has made it alot easier has been finding safe and healthy ways that I can spend time with my friends.” – Sean Dever, ‘21

TV Provides Much-Needed Escape During Quarantine

By Grace Van Duyn, ’22

Staff Writer

When quarantine hit our area in March, a lot of us found ourselves on our couches trying to find entertainment and an escape from the frightening reality on the news. As I thought about this, I wondered, what was the most popular show that people in the United States watched during quarantine and what did that say about our mentality at that time? I asked a few Hanover High students what they watched and the most popular answers were All American and Outer Banks. I also thought those television shows had to be some of the most streamed shows during quarantine. But, as I looked for information online to back up my classmates and my own opinions, I found that our guesses were wrong.

According to the Observer, an American online media company, the top three shows watched in the U.S. during quarantine were Spongebob, My Hero Academia, and Game of Thrones. I was surprised by this, but then realized that teens weren’t the only people who were looking for an escape from reality during quarantine. Many of the shows that were popular with teens weren’t even close to being the most watched in the United States.

Instead of watching regular programs, people tended to binge-watch certain shows and to try out different types of shows than they did before.  According to the Orlando Sentinel, the TV streaming search engine Reelgood analyzed its users’ viewing trends during the pandemic. Reelgood found that in May, three months into the quarantine, the top three shows that people watched for the first time were Ozark, Tiger King, and Breaking Bad. Reelgood also saw that genres such as animation, fantasy, and comedy all had a significant increase in their number of streams. In addition, Reelgood noticed that genres such as biographies, documentaries, war, and crime actually were streamed less during quarantine. Initially, I expected that all shows would have experienced an increase in their streams during the quarantine, but the data shows that generally people only chose to watch uplifting shows. Also, because so many families were together, family shows also saw a big increase in popularity. Families were spending an enormous amount of time together and these shows were very relatable. Also, for others who were separated from family and friends, these shows reminded them of feelings of unity and love. Some of these shows were Modern Family, Friends, and Schitt$ Creek.

I think television was a distraction that we needed during this difficult time. So many people were quarantined at home to protect others and themselves. If you were able to be home and healthy, television might have made your time a little easier. You might have even bonded with others over a show like Tiger King that would normally never have caught your attention. As the data that Reelgood collected proves, we all searched for shows that could make us forget about our realities and give us a needed smile or laugh. This pandemic showed us a lot about our world and even how important simple things like television can be.     

Keep the conversation going. In the comments, tell us what shows got you and your friends through the quarantine? 

Source: https://www.orlandosentinel.com/entertainment/tv/os-et-what-people-watch-during-coronavirus-20200522-a2u7h7wflfd3jn225qbb3p6cfm-story.html

featured image: https://time.com/5836749/share-tv-computer-quarantine/

Students Debate Pains, Gains of Homework

By Ashley Stracco, ’24

Staff Writer

It’s a question that students and teachers have been debating for years. Is homework helpful, or is it just a pain? I was expecting the students I interviewed to say that it was a pain, but to my surprise, the answers varied widely. Here’s what eight students from Hanover High had to say:

Brody Leibfarth, grade 9

“In some senses it is a pain, but in others probably not. If you understand a concept and don’t need any more help, then it is stupid. But if you don’t understand the concept, then it is helpful.”

Maddie Kapur, grade 9

“I believe that homework is helpful, but only in moderation. Too much homework can cause extreme amounts of unnecessary stress, but too little homework cannot help the student to learn enough. A moderated amount of homework helps the student enough to aid their learning experience without hurting it.”

Brianna Cole, grade 10

“I honestly have mixed opinions about this. Some subjects warrant homework more than others because you need to master the skill. In math homework you need to practice the skills and develop your knowledge so you can continue on your pathway. It is the same thing with Spanish. You have homework so that you can pass. There’s only certain things that you should have homework for. It helps with the development when and if you go to college. It is necessary in most subjects, but not all.”

Daniel Nguyen, grade 10

“There needs to be a balance. … When homework becomes “busy work” to fill in grades or when homework is taking away a student’s entire afternoon because there is a copious amount of it, no one is truly finding the joy in learning anymore and in this case, homework is absolutely pointless. One can argue that the student is still learning, however, is the student happy to learn? Chances are, no they’re not. If you’re a teacher, I assume that you want your students to enter class with the mindset of “What can we learn today?” But when that same student is assigned packets of homework that takes an entire afternoon and evening to complete, I can assure you they’re thinking of “How much homework are we going to have tonight?” the first 30 minutes that they wake up.

Ray Tschudy, grade 11

 “I have different feelings. Homework is a nuisance if you know what you are doing but it should be optional if you don’t already know what you are doing. It should not be mandatory.”

Bella Kelley, grade 11

“While nobody likes homework, it can sometimes be helpful depending on what it is. Like, if your homework is reading in a textbook, that is very important and helpful.”

Sam Wing, grade 12

“I feel like overall we should have homework but not to the extent that we have it now. I think that we get too much now. I think it helps in the sense that helps us out. It helps us on the exams.”

Nathan Vo, grade 12

“I think that it is helpful when it is not clearly busy work.”

It seems like people have mixed feelings about homework. Students may not necessarily enjoy doing it, but acknowledge that it helps them in the long run, as long as the work is not just busy work.

Unique Freshman Year for Fully Remote Students

By Norah Kelley, ’24

Staff Writer

Zoom. Edgenuity. VHS Learning. These are the ways that the dozens of students in the high school’s Virtual Academy are learning in this unpredictable, crazy year. For those who are freshmen, it’s even crazier. The freshmen who are a part of the Virtual Academy have had to start their high school career… all online.

Freshman year is supposed to be filled with new opportunities, making new friends, and trying to figure out what high school is going to be like. None of those can happen when you are sitting in front of your computer screen at home alone

Ashley Stracco, who misses the social aspects of going to school, has mixed feelings about waiting until next fall for her first chance to walk the halls of Hanover High.

“I don’t know how I feel about starting my high school career for the first time as a sophomore,” she said. “It seems exciting, but I wish I was starting it as a freshman.”

Freshmen that are in the Virtual Academy do not get to interact with many other students throughout the school day, unlike their counterparts who are a part of the hybrid model. Except for the Zoom meetings that happen twice a week for virtual students, these students often don’t feel very involved in school. 

“I have not participated in any school activities this year,” said Baylor Speckman.

Virtual Academy coordinators have done a great job trying to get these students involved in school, making sure announcements get to the fully remote students and that events like the Student Council’s recent Clash of the Classes strive to include them. But with many clubs not running this year and activities very limited even for hybrid students, the virtual freshmen are missing their chance to try new things – something that freshman year is all about.

“If the pandemic disappeared, I would go back to school tomorrow,” Baylor said. “But for right now, I think the best option for myself is to stay home.” 

Though going to school virtually has been a huge adjustment for all students, there are some freshmen who are enjoying it.

“If I could go back to school tomorrow, I wouldn’t because I really like being remote,” said Bridget Sanders. While she is missing out on new friendships, she likes remote learning because, “… it allows me to form my own schedule and learn at my own pace.”

Student Newspaper Set to Resume Publication!

After months of shutdown due to the pandemic, where we only managed to publish occasional updates on Twitter, The Indian is back in business and looking for writers and photographers. If you are interested in writing about school news, current events, arts and entertainment, sports – or like telling stories through photographs – please email Mrs McHugh by Dec. 9 at smchugh@hanoverschools.org. We will hold meetings and publish virtually, with the hope for a print issue before the end of the school year. No experience is necessary. All students are welcome!

2020 Drama Festival Filled with Powerful Performances

This year, Hanover High School’s Drama Club hosted the 2020 METG Drama Festival preliminary round in February. It was an excellent and long day of superb theater!

So how does festival work? Each school that attends performs a short, one act play for a judges’ panel. The school needs to place their set in five minutes, perform their show in 40 and take down their set in another five. Once a play starts, no one can enter or leave the theater. In addition, the judges should not be able to hear the name of the school performing before the play starts.

Viewing Festival is a lot for the brain. Eight pieces of theater is a lot to comprehend. However, the day flies by and the students from different schools have a chance to interact with other “theater kids” from around the area. So what was each show like? I’ll walk you through my favorite parts of the day.

Starting off the day strong was The Clark School, from Rowley, Mass., in their production of “Lila the Werewolf” by Peter S. Beagle. In the show, the character Farrell, played by Sean Bax, deals with learning his girlfriend, Lila, played by Caroline Lucey, is a werewolf. Through the show, you meet Farrell’s friend and narrator Ben, portrayed by Christian Grant, the super of the building who’s out to get Lila (Ryan Trabulsi) and Lila’s intense mother Bernice (Rose DiNoto). The show was filled with dark humor. I really enjoyed Grant’s performance as Ben. I thought he brought a level of humor to the supernatural as well as carried the show excellently with his narration. He and Bax, who played Farrell, won awards for their stellar performance. The set design, in addition, did an excellent job of blending the supernatural and the real world together with their use of shadow puppets.

The next show of the day was “Radium Girls” by D.W. Gregory performed by Southeastern Regional Vocational High School. The story follows Grace, portrayed in this production by Colleen Wood, who unveils the mystery of why all the girls who worked at the Radium Factory are getting sick. Through lawsuits and publicity, Grace needs to make a choice between doing what is easy and doing what is right. My favorite part of this production was that all of the main characters, including the male leads, were portrayed by women. Whether or not this was done intentionally, I thought it was a great way to highlight the historic significance of this tragic event. Another excellent aspect was the set and makeup design. Their set featured an interesting use of large platforms and a large clock that continued moving throughout the whole performance to highlight the mortality of the girls. The makeup in the show was fantastic. The makeup designer did an excellent job of applying prosthetics to the girls very quickly in order to make them look more sick as the show progressed. She was, rightly so, recognized by the judges. My personal favorite performance was Coleen Malley as Arthur Roeder, the factory head. She did an excellent job of portraying the wide range of emotions and stress that Arthur experiences throughout the play. I loved her performance and so did the judges!

One of the best plays of the day, and my personal favorite, was “Monster” by Don Zolidis. Performed by Weymouth High School, Monster is centered around Mary Shelley’s 19th century writing of “Frankenstein.”  Shelley formed the idea for Frankenstein from a dream she had while competing in a ghost story competition with her friends. The play takes place during this ghost story competition at Lord Byron’s summer house in Switzerland. Whilst telling the stories, there is a “Ghost ensemble” that performs them. The play touches on experiences from Mary and Percy Shelley’s life that influenced her ideas and her writing for Frankenstein. While some of it is added for theme purposes, the story is very historically accurate. While I would love to dive into Mary’s life experience, for purposes of brevity, I recommend you watch a documentary on Mary Shelley’s life. Some of the most notable performances included the ghost ensemble; Lord Byron, played by Zach Norton; and John Polidori, played by James Harmon, who were all recognized by the judges. While she was not recognized, I thought that Abigail Huard’s portrayal of Mary was fantastic. I thought she carried the show brilliantly and was exactly how I imagined Mary to be in my head. Overall, I think what brought the show to the next level was their set design and technical effects. There were black lights and strobe lights that really set the mood of tension when the ghost stories were being told. The set was fantastic.  When the actors moved to different places, it really felt like they were moving through an old house. The show was not the most funny nor emotionally powerful of the day but, combined with the superb acting, technical effects and set, the show was one of the best.

The next show was our very own Hanover High School performing, in my opinion, the funniest show of the day, “The Scheme of the Driftless Shifter” by Carolyn Lane. This show is, as one judge put it, “an intentional trainwreck.” There was a “fight” in the audience, a disgruntled cleaning lady, fake snow, lines dropped and a man playing a dog, all while a cast is trying to perform a very serious production. This show was the epitome of hilarious. I was keeling over in my seat laughing, on the verge of tears and peeing myself. The accents, for starters – notably Ben Mannings’s Scottish accent as Henry Pompington, – really added to the idea that the cast of the show was trying to put on a very serious production and failing miserably. There were many times in the show that you thought it was ending and the curtain would close, and then a new chaotic scene would start. It was hysterical and, by far, the funniest show of the day. Elise Falvey, Maia Arbia and Peter Bell were all recognized for their performances as Petunia Pompington, the Stage Manager and the Piano Player, respectively.

Picking up after lunch was Lynnfield High School performing “Brilliant Traces” by Cindy Lou Johnson. This was a two person show! The entire show was carried by Grace Mealy as Rossanah DeLuce and Greyson Wainwright as Henry Harry. In the play, Rossanah arrived at Henry’s door in the middle of an Alaskan whiteout dressed in a wedding dress. Through the course of a couple days, the two deal with the aftermath of the situation and learn about each other. I thought that the show was very impressive. However, at times it felt to me as if it was artsy and different, and flaunted it. But, that’s more a commentary on the writing and directorial direction and not on the performance. I thought that Mealy and Wainwright did an excellent job of displaying the sudden intimacy of the characters as well as the humanity the two discover within themselves through their meeting. I thought the lighting and sound design were quite bland; however, there isn’t too much to be done with a show that is so chemistry-driven. The set design was beautiful. The cabin was very realistic and utilized angles very well to create an excellent sense of space. From an audience standpoint, the use of props allowed the show to feel natural and like you were witnessing a real tender moment between two people. Overall the show was not my favorite but a very interesting experience and an opportunity to see two fabulous student actors.

“Anybody for Tea?” by C.B. Gifford was the show performed by Notre Dame Academy. This show was about six old spinsters who start to murder each other in order to lure the “very attractive” Captain Williams (Clare Kennedy) to their house. A common compliment I’ve had for festival has been the set design. Notre Dame’s set was fabulous. The house of the old ladies felt exactly what you would expect to see in a house with six old spinsters. The lighting design was interesting because it utilized lamps on the stage, but the sound was a little bland. Overall, the show was a little too slow for me. However, the six spinsters’ performances were so accurate. Their body language and style of speaking really led me to believe they where old ladies. My favorite performance was Connaught Riley as Hildegarde Hodge who (spoiler) is the one who commits the two murders. Her confession was hysterical and added to the whimsy of the darker content. “Anybody for Tea” was not my type of show, but it was a delightful mystery and a funny performance.

Everett High School performed “Augusta & Noble” by Carlos Murillo. This show brought tears to my eyes. I could neither classify it as a comedy or drama but rather a wholesome and important story to tell. The story follows Gabi Castillo, a daughter of immigrants from Mexico who is struggling with her identity. Through a blend of dreams and the real world, Gabi learns that despite being an immigrant, she belongs here. The show was sweet and shed light on real struggles of disadvantaged immigrant families. Jhalyshka Feliciano’s performance as Gabi was beautiful and I found it very easy to sympathize with her. Feliciano was awarded for her performance. The lighting design had to be my favorite part of the show. There were parts in the show where they would be in the desert or at school, and I thought the lighting design done by Bryan de Souza really made the show come together as a whole.

The most powerful performance of the day for me personally was “My Love Lies Frozen In the Ice” by The Dead Rabbits and performed by Boston Latin School. Like “Augusta & Noble,” I really couldn’t classify this show as either a comedy or a drama, but it was nothing like the show prior to it. The play follows Mathilde, played by Alexa Wong, as her brother Solomon (Ian Wright) and fiance Nils (Calvin Szulc) develop a balloon that will carry them to the North Pole. They then leave her behind, only to never return. This play was filled with audience interactions, improvisation and heart-wrenching moments. One of the coolest technical aspects of the show was that a large balloon was thrown into the audience as well as a small balloon that floated from the booth down to the stage. I applaud the technical crew for including such fun interactive moments and the actors improvising with the small mishaps. What made the show so powerful for me was Alexa Wong’s performance as Mathilde. She was able to clearly narrate and carry the story. She had these amazing moments of hilarity and many moments of sadness and heartbreak, all of which were delivered with clarity. She was lovable and relatable and one of my favorite performances of the day. She earned a performance award from the judges.

At the end of the day, I think all of these shows deserved to move on to the next round of competition, which was unfortunately delayed – and then cancelled – because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Each was so different but equally as wonderful. The three that advanced were “Monster,” “My Love Lies Frozen In the Ice” and “Augusta & Noble.” 

Most Influential People, 2009 vs 2019

By Caris Mann

For most of us at Hanover High School, the past decade was the most instrumental of our lives so far. We grew up in this decade and grew fascinated with the trends and people we encountered. But the people we looked up to in 2009 are so different from the people we looked up to in 2019. Every year, TIME Magazine posts a list of the 100 most influential people of the year. Let’s take a look back on some of the most influential people in 2009 vs 2019.

2009

Barack Obama – President of the United States

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In 2009, Obama was voted one of the most influential political leaders of the year. Obama was inaugurated that year, taking over the presidency from George W. Bush. During that year, Obama lowered unemployment rates, expanded the children’s health care program, and won the Nobel Prize. He worked hard that year to benefit the people of the United States and forever made a lasting impression.

Brad Pitt – Actor

Image result for brad pittIt may come as a surprise to some people, but Brad Pitt was not deemed influential because of his acting. He was actually recognized under the category “Builders and Titans.” This was because of his work with the foundation he established called Make It Right. After Hurricane Katrina, Pitt created the foundation to help rebuild affordable homes for the people of New Orleans.  He also advocated for his movie “The Curious Case of Benjamin Button” to be shot in New Orleans to show off the culture of the city. Pitt put the needs of the people of New Orleans in front of his own.

Jeff Kinney – Author

Image result for jeff kinney wimpy kidWe all know Jeff Kinney as the author of the Diary of a Wimpy Kid books. In 2009, Kinney was voted as one of the most influential artists and entertainers. Everyone relates to Kinney’s hilarious stories of Greg Heffley as he tries to navigate his way through middle school. We’ve all been there, whether it’s dealing with your annoying older brother and his stupid band or being terrified to talk to that one girl. By creating a book series that resonated, Kinney instilled a lifelong love of reading in countless young children. 

Michelle Obama – First Lady

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In 2009, Michelle Obama was voted as one of the many heroes and icons by TIME Magazine. And why not? She inspires people every day to live their best lives. She is a working mother whose goals are to better the lives of other people. In 2009, she planted the White House Kitchen Garden to encourage healthy eating within the White House. She wanted the people of the United States to commit to a healthy lifestyle in order to live a longer life. She works incredibly hard to ensure the best lifestyle of the citizens of the United States.

Connie Hedegaard – Scientist

Image result for Connie Hedegaard

TIME Magazine named Connie Hedegaard as one of the most influential scientists and thinkers of 2009. Before researching this article, I had no idea who Connie Hedeguard was. But now I understand why TIME magazine loved her so much. She is a Danish politician and public intellectual who fights to end climate change. In 2009, she was picked to host the U.N. Framework Convention on Climate Change, where she worked to come up with a global solution to climate change. She is one of the many leaders who believes that climate change is a global problem that requires a global solution. 

2019

Sandra Oh – Actress

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In 2019 under the “Pioneers Category,” TIME voted for Sandra Oh. Most people know Sandra as Dr. Cristina Yang on the TV show Grey’s Anatomy. Oh is described by TIME as a hard worker with brilliant talent. She has an energy that is unmatched when she portrays Cristina. She is also described as a perfectionist who wants every part of her craft to be just right. She puts care into her work. She is also seen as a pioneer because she had to work her way to where she is today. She had to pay to go to acting school all on her own. Her parents never wanted her to become an actress. However, she never gave up and is enjoying the success that she has earned today.

Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson – Actor

Image result for dwayne the rock

Everyone has heard of the famous wrestler-turned-actor Dwayne Johnson. However, most people might not know that he was voted as TIME Magazine’s most influential artist of the year. According to TIME, Dwayne is an inspiration to all. He puts so much energy into the world around him. He runs a charity called “The Dwayne Johnson Rock Foundation” which works to help terminally ill children. He created  his own production company where he produces TV shows. He is starring in many new blockbuster movies and it was recently announced that he will be starring in his first superhero movie. Dwayne works hard to inspire the people around him.

Greta Thunberg – Activist

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Recently,  this teen activist has come into the spotlight for her global work on climate change, earning a spot on TIME’s list at the young age of 17. She has led many climate strikes and marches including the most famous, “Skipping School for Climate Change,” where many young teens decide to skip school for a day to encourage their governments to do something about climate change. She is also famous for her influential speeches which have been delivered in front of many world leaders. Perhaps her most famous one took place at the United Nations in 2019, where she told the leaders that they may love their children but they are taking their future away from them by not attempting to fix their climate. I have a feeling that this is not the last time we will hear from Greta Thunberg and I look forward to seeing what she will do next.

Michelle Obama – Activist

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Michelle Obama was named an icon once again in 2019. Throughout the last decade, she has continued her great work in helping to better American citizens. She started the Healthy Hunger-Free Kids program to offer healthy school lunches to every child in America. She started the Reach Higher program to inspire adults to continue their education after graduating high school. She has also launched the Global Girls Alliance where she will support 1,500 girls’ education programs. Even though she may no longer be the First Lady, Michelle still works hard to better our lives each day.

Lebron James – Athlete

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Basketball star LeBron James was nominated as 2019’s Titan of the Year. While he may be a star on the court, James is also a star in the field of philanthropy. He started the Promise School in his hometown of Akron, Ohio, for disadvantaged children. James also runs his own charity called the LeBron James Family Foundation. In addition, he supports many other charities such as After School All-Stars, the Boys and Girls Club, and the Children’s Defense Fund. He has even partnered with the University of Akron to provide 2,300 scholarships beginning in 2021. The value of education is important to James and he wants to be able to spread that influence to others.

New Face in the Main Office

By Ben Asnes, CJ Damore and Emily Gallagher

Originally published in the Stall Street Journal, created by Ms. Fraser’s POST program

Mrs. Susan Piche is the new administrative assistant in the main office at Hanover High School. Prior to working at Hanover High School, she was an administrative assistant at MAC Wholesale. Mrs. Piche attended North Kingstown High School in Rhode Island. After graduating from high school, she attended college at the University of Rhode Island. Mrs. Piche currently lives in East Bridgewater with her husband, two daughters, her dog and cat. Her hobbies are shopping with her daughters, cooking with her husband and exercising outside. In addition, she also enjoys going to the beach. In ten years from now, Mrs. Piche plans to spend more time traveling the country with her family.

Student Club is Dedicated to Helping Veterans

By Tim Sullivan

Created by a student whose family members served in the military, the Students for Soldiers club is committed to giving back to local veterans.

This past week, the club visited with veterans at the VA Hospital in West Roxbury. I am a part of this club and visiting veterans was an extremely humbling experience. We were all grateful to be able to hear some of the veterans’ stories and just simply thank them for all they have done for our country. This was the second time the club visited the VA medical center and just one of several events we’ve participated in since senior Jules Dunderdale created the club last year.

Jules decided to start SFS during her junior year because she wanted to give back to soldiers and veterans, and encourage others to do the same. Jules’ dad and both of her grandfathers served, and because of this, her family has always been extremely supportive of the military. Jules felt that starting this club would be an effective way to honor her relatives and anyone else who has ever served the country. She is proud of everything the club has accomplished and hopes that it will continue to grow over the years.

Before visiting the VA hospital this past week, the club raised money to donate to the facility through a gift wrapping and bake sale event back in December. SFS also was able to bring material donations to the veterans thanks to contributions from HHS students. In November, SFS worked with CarePacks to help make packages for veterans. CarePacks is an organization based in Weymouth that sends packages to veterans deployed around the world. The packages include snacks, toiletries, socks, shirts, and magazines and books. Founded in 2004, the organization holds community packing events several times a year.

Students for Soldiers, which is always looking for new members, is a wonderful way to give back to those who have given so much. This club is something I’m truly proud to be a part of and one I hope continues to grow. Check out some photos below from this year’s events and feel free to reach out to Jules for more information at jdunderdale20@hanoverstudents.org!

 

Some News Stories from 2019 will have Lasting Impact

by Grace Van Duyn

The year 2019 was full of achievements and struggles. The issues ranged from impeachment and immigration to Brexit, the college admissions scandal, and climate change. Notable events included  the fire that destroyed Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris and the World Cup win for the US Women’s Soccer Team. Although there were many important news stories, two that stuck out to me are the first photograph of a black hole and the devastating fires in the Amazon. The effects of these two events will be felt for years to come.

Image result for black hole
https://www.eso.org/public/images/eso1907h/

For the first time in history, astronomers captured and released a picture of a black hole. Before 2019, astronomers had struggled to find methods to take a picture of a place in space where no light could escape. A driven group of international astronomers and computer scientists worked together over the span of a decade to create technology so advanced that it could detect the faint silhouette of the black hole. Katie Bouman, a graduate student at MIT, helped to develop an algorithm that captured the image of the massive black hole. This discovery, announced last April, will be an important part of the study of astronomy in the future.

Image result for amazon rainforest firesThe Amazon rainforest fires, sparked in August, killed millions of animals, destroyed the homes of many indigenous tribes, and had a global environmental impact. This natural disaster impacted the entire world because it is the largest rainforest on Earth and is vital to all life. Experts blame these fires on increasing deforestation, trees being cut down to make room for cattle ranches or development. It could take hundreds of years for the wildlife and forests to recover.

Just a few weeks into 2020, the new year has plenty of issues and headlines of its own. So far, we have fires in Australia, conflict with Iran, the scandal in the British royal family known as Megxit, and the upcoming presidential election. As the year progresses, I hope that we are we are able to continue in our successes and address our problems. We have a whole new decade ahead of us. 

 

Featured photo: https://www.newscientist.com/article/2198937-first-ever-picture-of-a-black-hole-may-be-revealed-this-week/